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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

1 edition of Chemotherapy-induced emesis found in the catalog.

Chemotherapy-induced emesis

Chemotherapy-induced emesis

a review of aetiology, mechanisms, methodology and prospects for clinical management

  • 13 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by Scientific and Medical Division of Macmillan Press in Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Vomiting -- Chemotherapy -- Congresses.,
  • Nausea -- Congresses.,
  • Cancer -- Chemotherapy -- Complications -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Statementsupplement editors, S. Grunberg ... [et al.].
    GenreCongresses.
    SeriesBritish journal of cancer -- v. 66. -- Supplement -- 19., British journal of cancer -- no. 19.
    ContributionsGrunberg, S.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination76 p. :
    Number of Pages76
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14685201M

    Define chemotherapy-induced emesis. chemotherapy-induced emesis synonyms, chemotherapy-induced emesis pronunciation, chemotherapy-induced emesis translation, English dictionary definition of chemotherapy-induced emesis. The introduction of the antiemetics, serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists, have improved the control of chemotherapy-induced emesis, but the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea remains a significant clinical problem.

    Emesis can be objectively measured with direct independent observation. Nausea, which often accompanies emesis, is a subjective sensation that requires a patient's self-report to quantitate. The mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced nausea are less well understood at present and will not be addressed. Effective control of nausea and emesis is therefore a central goal of physicians using chemotherapy ent of emesis in a patient with Cited by:

    At or near the top of their concerns is the common adverse effect (AE) of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). When CINV goes untreated, it affects upwards of . Introduction. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is the most unpleasant side effect of treatment, and, in particular, nausea is still cited by patients as the one with the highest impact on their quality of life. 1 Patients undergoing chemotherapy show three different types of emesis (acute, delayed, and overall), each having particular characteristics. 1 In fact, acute Cited by:


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Chemotherapy-induced emesis Download PDF EPUB FB2

Data are conflicting regarding the effect of patient age on the severity of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. However, increasing evidence indicates that chemotherapy-induced emesis occurs more frequently in younger patients. 21,22,27 Fortunately, the best current antiemetic agents are effective and well tolerated by patients of all ages.

Paul A. Glare, Tanya Nikolova, in Supportive Oncology, Corticosteroids. Steroids have been studied mainly as second-line agents in chemotherapy-induced emesis, in the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with MBO, 79, and in the treatment of symptomatic raised intracranial pressure.

They are also used as second-line agents in chronic nausea of. chemotherapy-induced emesis: An adverse effect of many chemotherapeutics, which is usually self-limited and rarely life-threatening.

Highly emetogenic Cisplatin, carmustine, dacarbazine, dactinomycin, mechlorethamine (nitrogen mustard), streptozocin. Moderately emetogenic Azacitidine, arparginase, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin.

A meta-analysis comparing the efficacy of four 5-HT3-receptor antagonists for acute chemotherapy-induced emesis. Support Care Cancer. ; – Rojas C, Stathis M, Thomas AG, et al.

Palonosetron exhibits unique molecular interactions with the 5-HT3 receptor. Anesth Cited by: CHEMOTHERAPY-INDUCED NAUSEA AND VOMITING (CHEMOTHERAPY-induced emesis) is a common treatment-related side effect that has a detrimental effect on the quality of life of patients with cancer and.

Carpenter DO, Briggs DB, Strominger N. Behavioral and electrophysiological studies of peptide-induced emesis in dogs. Fed Proc. Dec; 43 (15)– Leslie RA, Gwyn DG.

Neuronal connections of the area postrema. Fed Proc. Dec; Cited by: INTRODUCTION. Few side effects of cancer treatment are more feared by the patient than nausea and vomiting. Although nausea and emesis (vomiting and/or retching) can result from surgery or radiation therapy, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is potentially the most severe and most distressing.

Read "Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting New Agents and New Uses of Current Agents" by available from Rakuten Kobo. This book provides a comprehensive review of new agents, a detailed description of new uses of Brand: Springer International Publishing. Ondansetron and chemotherapy induced emesis.- Editorial.- Comparison of ondansetron and alizapride in the prophylaxis of lymphoma chemotherapy-indueed emesis.- Comparison of ondansetron with a combined regimen of alizapride and methylprednisolone in the prophylaxis of cisplatin-induced emesis in patients with lung cancer.-Author: M.

Marty. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a significant problem in the treatment of children with cancer. The last decade has seen a variety of.

Buy Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: New Agents and New Uses of Current Agents: Read Kindle Store Reviews - New insights into the pathophysiology of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, a better understanding of patients at risk, and the availability of new Cited by: delayed chemotherapy-induced emesis (occurring 25 to hours after chemotherapy) (Table 1), although it can also induce acute chemotherapy-induced emesis Substance P is the principal neurotransmitter that activates neurokinin-1 Figure 1.

Pathophysiological Aspects of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting. 5-HTFile Size: KB. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of the most feared and severe side effects of cancer treatment. Incidence has been reported in as high as 70%–80% of patients. Incidence of nausea tends to be higher than that of actual vomiting, and antiemetic medications tend to be less effective in controlling nausea.

Chemotherapy-induced emesis has a major adverse impact on patients undergoing therapy for various malignancies, and this has led to considerable research in this field.

Most investigative efforts have concentrated on the acute phase of emesis that occurs within the first 24 hours after chemotherapy, and significant strides forward have been made with this Cited by:   Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is associated with a significant deterioration in quality of life.

The emetogenicity of the chemotherapeutic agents, repeated chemotherapy cycles, and patient risk factors significantly influence CINV.

The use of a combination of a serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, dexamethasone and a neurokinin 1 Cited by:   ABSTRACT: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a major side effect of cancer therapy.

Research is under way to develop ideal antiemetics, and recently the FDA has approved drugs that make chemotherapy more tolerable. This review looks at some of the older drugs as well as more recent agents on the market. Grunberg SM, Deuson RR, Mavros P, et al.

Incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis after modern antiemetics. Cancer. ; Medline, Google Scholar: 7. Erazo Valle A, Wisniewski T, Figueroa Vadillo JI, et al. Incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in Mexico: healthcare provider predictions versus observed Cited by: 4.

Ondansetron and chemotherapy induced emesis.- Editorial.- Comparison of ondansetron and alizapride in the prophylaxis of lymphoma chemotherapy-indueed emesis.- Comparison of ondansetron with a combined regimen of alizapride and methylprednisolone in the prophylaxis of cisplatin-induced emesis in patients with lung cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: Challenges and Opportunities for Improved Patient Outcomes At a Glance F Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) re-mains an important adverse effect despite the introduction of new antiemetic medications, with delayed effects more common than acute symptoms.

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a distressing and common adverse event associated with cancer treatment. Seventy to eighty percent of patients undergoing chemotherapy experience emesis, with % experiencing anticipatory emesis. CINV results in significant morbidity and negatively impacts patient quality of : Rudolph M.

Navari.Despite significant progress in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) with the introduction of new antiemetic agents, 30–50% of patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC or HEC) and guideline directed prophylactic antiemetics develop breakthrough CINV.

International guidelines recommend the treatment of Cited by:   It is commonly claimed that the nausea and vomiting accompanying cytotoxic chemotherapy have a negative impact on health-related quality of life.

While this may seem self-evident, until a few years ago there was little empirical data demonstrating that the failure to control postchemotherapy emesis affects aspects of quality of life.

In spite of their limitations, Cited by: